Can You Pass The Countable and Uncountable Noun Exercise Test?

Countable and Uncountable Noun Exercise is part of Noun In English Grammar.

Let’s recap the previous topics quickly.

You must have read the noun definition along with the kinds of the noun. So you know there are five kinds of nouns. So you can say this subject is a part of common nouns.

You must have read the countable and uncountable noun definition and its examples. Here you will practice the countable and uncountable nouns.

You will find the following kinds of exercises below.

  • Identify the countable and uncountable nouns.
  • Use of many and much with nouns
  • Use of articles with the nouns

Let us start the subject – Countable and Uncountable Noun Exercise.

Countable and Uncountable Noun Exercise – Type 1

Exercise – 1

Identify the countable and uncountable nouns in the following sentences of the countable and uncountable noun exercise.

  1. Go and buy some rice and vegetables.
  2. Who can find pens of black colour?
  3. How many mangoes are there in the basket?
  4. She does not like to drink Coca-Cola.
  5. The lady was loaded with gold.

Check Your Answers

Here are the answers to the above sentences of countable and uncountable noun exercise. Check them and evaluate yourself. Countable nouns are underlined in the sentences. On the contrary, the uncountable nouns are bold.

  1. Go and buy some rice and vegetables.
  2. Who can find pens of black colour?
  3. How many mangoes are there in the basket?
  4. She does not like to drink Coca-Cola.
  5. The lady was loaded with gold.

Let us examine the above sentences of countable and uncountable noun exercise closely. You can find many countable and uncountable nouns in the above sentences – rice and vegetables, pens, mangoes, Coca-Cola, and gold. The nouns like rice and vegetables, Coca-Cola, and gold are uncountable because you can not count but weigh them.

On the contrary, nouns like pens and mangoes are countable because you can count them.

Countable and Uncountable Noun Exercise – Type 2

Exercise – 1

Fill in the blanks with much, many, a few, or a little in the following sentences of countable and uncountable noun exercise.

  1. Last week there was so……….rain while we expected ……… drops of rain.
  2. Sam is so greedy that he fell ill by eating so……….sweets and drinking so………..juice at the party.
  3. One should never have so…………..butter and so………….potatoes in the dinner.
  4. Grandfather drank ……..drops of milk. He could drink ……….. milk with glass.
  5. Can you put ………… sugar into the teacup.

Check Your Answers

Here are the answers to the above sentences of countable and uncountable noun exercise. Check them and evaluate yourself.

  1. Last week there was so much rain while we expected a few drops of rain.
  2. Sam is so greedy that he fell ill by eating so many sweets and drinking so much juice at the party.
  3. One should never have so much butter and so many potatoes in the dinner.
  4. Grandfather drank a few drops of milk. He could drink a little milk with a glass.
  5. Can you put a little sugar into the teacup?

Before examining these sentences of countable and uncountable noun exercise, let us make the above words clear. There are four words given to us for fill up – much, many, a few, and a little.

Much and a little are the words used for uncountable nouns. But, on the contrary, many and a few are the words used for countable nouns.

Now let us see the above sentences one by one. In the first sentence, the words – rain and drops of rain are nouns. Rain is an uncountable noun, so much is there for the term. But drops of rain are countable nouns, so ‘a few’ word is there for the noun.

In the second sentence, sweets, and juice the words to make it clear. Sweets are countable, so we use many for it. On the other hand, the liquid is not countable. It is uncountable, so we should use much for it.

The third sentence tells that much and many should be used with butter and potatoes. The first is uncountable, and the second is countable.

In the fourth sentence, drops of milk are countable, so we use a few for it. But milk is uncountable, so we use a little for it.

In the last sentence, sugar is uncountable. So it is good to use a little for it. But, moreover, a little means a sufficient amount of item.

Countable and Uncountable Noun Exercise – Type 3

Exercise – 1

Fill in the blanks the following sentences of countable and uncountable noun exercise with a, an, and some at the suitable place.

  1. Nagaland is ……… small state.
  2. Shanker has to finish ………. work by tomorrow.
  3. My brother was looking for …….. house in lockdown.
  4. Thomas Alva Edison was doing ………. experiments on electric bulb.
  5. You can not lift this log, as it is ……… heavy one.

Check Your Answers

Here are the answers to the above sentences of countable and uncountable noun exercise. Check them and evaluate yourself.

  1. Nagaland is a small state.
  2. Shanker has to finish some work by tomorrow.
  3. My brother was looking for a house in lockdown.
  4. Thomas Alva Edison was doing some experiments on electric bulbs.
  5. You can not lift this log, as it is heavy one.

Let us again make some terms clear for the above countable and uncountable noun exercise. We need to use articles a and an. Apart from these articles, we need to use some. Let us make them clear.

Article a and an is used for the countable nouns only. So, if ‘a’ and ‘an’ fit in the sentences, it is a countable noun. But, if it doesn’t work well, it means that it is an uncountable noun. Some is a word that you can use for both countable and uncountable nouns. So, understand the sense of the sentence and use the word ‘some.’

Now let us see the sentences one by one.

There is a word ‘state.’ The state is a countable noun in the first sentence. So, it would be best if you used a with the word.

Some fit well with work in the second sentence, so you should use some as a fill.

House being a countable noun, you should use the article ‘a’ with it.

The fourth sentence talks about the experiments. It is a plural word. You know the articles a and an are singular ones. You have ‘some’ as a choice.

The fifth sentence also tells about a log, a countable noun. It starts with a vowel sound. So, it would help if you used the article ‘a’ with the log.

Hope you understand the countable and uncountable noun exercise well. Now visit the countable and uncountable nouns rules of the noun in English grammar.

 

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